A stressed nurse crouching to the floor

How Addiction’s Effects on Healthcare Professionals Extend to Their Patients

Given the ongoing pandemic and consequent increased demands placed upon the nation’s healthcare professionals—doctors, nurses and all medical caregivers—it should come as no surprise many of their ranks have struggled with issues of substance abuse or addiction. In an attempt to cope with or self-medicate from the additional COVID-related stresses, responsibilities, physical pain, sleep deprivation…

Business Professionals Who Struggle with Addiction Can Find Recovery in Executive Drug Rehab

populations who struggle with addiction, many seemingly successful individuals also struggle with this condition. High-achieving, wealthy people in white-collar careers experience substance use disorders at high rates, often beginning drug abuse as students and then continuing the problem when they enter a competitive, stressful workforce. Some professions that involve stressful lifestyles are at greater risk…

Doctors and Nurses with Substance Abuse Disorders Put Patients at Risk

When healthcare workers become dependent upon the very drugs intended to help their patients, disaster is right around the corner. And the problem is not limited to just a few doctors and nurses addicted to painkillers. Indeed, survey results indicate 1 out of 10 healthcare workers (10%) will experience substance abuse or addiction issues during…

Facing the Problem of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse in Medical Professionals

  Given medical professionals—surgeons, doctors, nurses, etc.—have dedicated huge amounts of schooling, training time and effort to prepare for their jobs and then go on to dedicate their lives to helping others recover their health and wellness, their very lives in some cases, it may seem paradoxical there would be such high percentages of alcoholism…

Treating Nurses with Substance Use Disorders

In an article by Daniel Angres, M.D., et al. titled, “Nurses with Chemical Dependency: Promoting Successful Treatment and Reentry” (published in The Journal of Nursing Regulation), the authors state the literature on chemical dependency in nurses lags far behind that for other health-care professionals, particularly physicians. “However,” they point out, “with nurses on the front…

Some Reflections on Treatment and Recovery for Dentists with Substance Use Disorders – PART TWO

When most dentists show up for work at a dental office, they’re not working alongside another dentist who is impaired by alcohol or drugs. Still, statistics indicate anywhere from 12 to 19% of dentists face a substance use disorder within their lifetime.[1] Given this understandably surprising (if not startling) information, the question arises: What can…

a professional struggles with addiction

Why Addiction Treatment Is Different for Professionals

When dealing with a substance abuse issue, addicted professionals must deal with it differently. Being a professional puts addiction in a completely different light and calls for distinctive addiction treatment solutions. There are many professionals who are addicted to some substance or another, but people often don’t realize the extent of their problem. Sometimes professionals…

More Than Half of Pandemic Healthcare at Risk for Mental Health Issues and Alcohol Abuse  

Given the current COVID-19 health crisis, every U.S. community depends on the mental health of its frontline healthcare workers, including emergency and hospital personnel, doctors and nurses. According to a new study, those regularly facing pandemic-related stressors are at greater risk for mental health problems. The research, which was published in the November 2020 online…

Prescription Drug Abuse Among Doctors – Not Uncommon, But Treatment is Available and Recovery is Possible

According to research conducted by Lisa Merlo, PhD, a researcher at the University of Florida’s Center for Addiction Research and Education and published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, while doctors abuse alcohol or drugs at about the same rate as the general public, they’re five times as likely to abuse prescription drugs.[1] There are…